When Orwellian Surveillance Starts at Home

Disclosure:  This post appears in slightly different form on a private social media page. On this post, I’m sharing a screenshot of something I found on Twitter earlier this afternoon.  Both Twitter entries are by the same person, and I believe she is acting with good intentions.  Her avi and username are ersased from the screenshot because of my own concerns about a phone app she is using. Unfortunately, the second (lower) message includes a link to a blogsite which recommends the app in question.  That’s where I got more uncomfortable, and I cropped the link from the screenshot. According … Continue reading When Orwellian Surveillance Starts at Home

Out of Fabric? You Can Still Make a Privacy Curtain, if You’re Creative

Dave Hill posted on Facebook this morning, and after communicating with him on social media (and reading his books, watching his videos and listening to his radio show) for a long time I’m still not sure what to think. It isn’t possible to use the Helen Christie public Facebook page to comment on others’ posts, so I used my private account.  The real name on my personal Facebook account is erased from the screenshot (see below) for privacy. Such nonsense. Anyone who wants to know my real name can find it during an internet search, but nobody cares to look. … Continue reading Out of Fabric? You Can Still Make a Privacy Curtain, if You’re Creative

Good People Are Sensitive. Bullies Are Just Thin-Skinned

Maybe the title of this post oversimplifies things. The topic is embarrassing photos.  People with integrity won’t snap pictures of someone’s most humiliating moments and post them online, and I wish we could get that message across to the juvenile types who haven’t grasped the concept. When a man gets an inopportune erection or a woman has a menstrual bleed-through, the best people (of any age)  will either pretend not to notice or do something to protect the unfortunate person.  It isn’t unheard of for two women to be seen walking, one close behind the other, to the restroom.  Don’t … Continue reading Good People Are Sensitive. Bullies Are Just Thin-Skinned

Private Trauma Made Public

The link at the end of this post goes to a discreet report on something which shouldn’t have been made public in the first place. It’s shared here as an example of a common-but-ethically-dubious human interest story.  Depending on who was driving the car pulled over by police, the child may be in a disastrous family situation.  The public sees something sweet, but the baby may be aware of a lot more.  And none of it is any of our business. Not every report of this type is discreet.  Sometimes names are made public, and the photographs and video can … Continue reading Private Trauma Made Public

Cover That Lens!

At least a few years ago, I read a suspense novel which depicted a stalker watching his victim online.  He had infected her home computer with spyware, and whenever she walked in front of the webcam he could see her.  I don’t recall the book’s title or author, but if memory serves, he enjoyed watching her do stretching exercises while naked. I took heed.  A piece of paper is taped over my laptop webcam, which as far as I know doesn’t harm the lens.  No adhesive touches the lens, and it’s removed easily when I need to use the webcam. … Continue reading Cover That Lens!

Privacy (Nonfiction) by Garret Keizer

Privacy by Garret Keizer Nonfiction Published by Picador in 2012 — Original Paperback $15.00   The topic of privacy has prompted some emotional debates concerning politics, law, national security, health, philosophy and basic decency.  I never thought I’d see it addressed so well in 154 pages.   Garret Keizer has a sophisticated grasp of the ways personal matters are shared, and how fear, curiosity, cultural differences and other factors influence boundaries.  Although he cites Supreme Court decisions, the author is careful not to turn his book into a political or legal statement.  He encourages the reader to think of privacy as … Continue reading Privacy (Nonfiction) by Garret Keizer