Curbing the Public’s Bag Consumption

There are many theories on how to do this. In San Francisco, we’ve had a local ordinance for a while, demanding a ten cent fee for each paper or “reusable” (thick) plastic bag used by customers when they pay for store merchandise.  It’s meant to encourage customers to bring their own bags, or use no bags when buying just one or two things. I got into the habit of using my own bag way before there was a law, and I’ve been making general allowances in my routine to reduce waste since the early 1980s. “Save the dinosaurs,” I used … Continue reading Curbing the Public’s Bag Consumption

Curb the Plastics

In case you’ve never heard of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, a link to an article on The Guardian’s site appears below. The answer is to reduce our use of plastic.  Recycling can go only so far. When shopping for hygiene items, be suspicious of the word microbead.  Microbeads are usually tiny pieces of plastic that create the desired abrasiveness in skin cleansers.  They go down the basin or shower drain when you rinse your skin, and they don’t get weeded out in the system.  Those microbeads end up anywhere, including the ocean.  They’re among the microplastics that aren’t likely to … Continue reading Curb the Plastics