Curb the Plastics

In case you’ve never heard of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, a link to an article on The Guardian’s site appears below. The answer is to reduce our use of plastic.  Recycling can go only so far. When shopping for hygiene items, be suspicious of the word microbead.  Microbeads are usually tiny pieces of plastic that create the desired abrasiveness in skin cleansers.  They go down the basin or shower drain when you rinse your skin, and they don’t get weeded out in the system.  Those microbeads end up anywhere, including the ocean.  They’re among the microplastics that aren’t likely to … Continue reading Curb the Plastics

Some Taxes Aren’t as Big a Hardship as You Think

I don’t recall which year merchants began charging for paper or reusable plastic bags in San Francisco.  It may have been in 2012. I was already in the habit of bringing my own bag to the store, so I found it easy to adjust. Not everyone has the advantage of finding time to focus on those details, though.  It seems unlikely anyone who is grocery shopping with a van full of kids will remember to load bags into the van before leaving the house.  So, the parent who has to look for bargains on groceries to feed a large family … Continue reading Some Taxes Aren’t as Big a Hardship as You Think

San Francisco Recycling Woes

San Francisco has the toughest recycling laws of any place.  Our trash must be sorted carefully, and at least four bins are involved.  A few things have to be disposed of by making an appointment with the city’s contractor, Recology, and then placing the items at the curb. Sometimes we have to find a store that collects old cell phones or CFL bulbs. Even the most meticulous people will make mistakes, and I’m under the impression that most S.F. residents aren’t that meticulous.  They make more work for the people who have to sift through all of that crap after … Continue reading San Francisco Recycling Woes

Bring Your Own Bag To The Store

I admit that on most days I’m less overwhelmed than a lot of people. Uh, sort of.  Wait.  Scratch that.  Then again, don’t.  Whatever. What I’m trying to say is, usually, I remember to do the picky little things that we tend to forget when we’re already multi-tasking. I carry a canvas grocery bag — sometimes more than one, in different sizes — in my purse.  The purse is big, and as a general rule I don’t go into stores where they expect us to leave large purses with the staff. So, this particular system works for me but maybe … Continue reading Bring Your Own Bag To The Store