Naïve Wording, or Intended Vulgarity?

At the end of this post, please see two screenshots I found on “Constitutional Conservative” politician Paul Nehlen’s @pnehlen Twitter feed this morning: His profile, and a post which contains a Did he mean to say that? bit of profanity. In fairness, the four-letter T word is more obscure than most obscenities.  Still, this social media user’s post defends someone who has hurt women.  Did he set out to use a word which insults women?  We’ll never know.  There’s a chance one of his kindred spirits will approach him discreetly and say, “Paul, I’m sure you don’t know what you just did, but…”  … Continue reading Naïve Wording, or Intended Vulgarity?

Don’t Expect Important Reforms

This post appears in slightly different form as a private social media post. One of the people — at least one — who replied to this tweet (see below) asked if Portia de Rossi reported the incident. She reported it exactly the way she was supposed to report it, and that was made clear in her Twitter post. Immediately after the incident, she called her agent, who was supposed to protect her.  In a better world, the agent would have gone to the police with her.  Instead, the agent gave an inappropriate, sheepish response on the telephone, which made it … Continue reading Don’t Expect Important Reforms

Too Many Characters Here

Twitter has finally done it.  After a brief test run, today they announced that the character limit for tweets will officially double, to two hundred eighty.  Soon we’ll all have that dubious privilege. Given the shortened attention span caused by habitual online surfing, will most people be able to handle reading the longer posts?  Only time will tell. Okay, I’ll share my real gripe.  In the past few years, I’ve developed a skill for expressing a thought in a short text piece.  Now that talent is rendered obsolete.  It’s okay.  I’ll adjust. On the other hand, there may be an … Continue reading Too Many Characters Here

The World Has Gone Mad. Or is it Just Our Own Backyard?

A link to a Washington Post article by Travis M. Andrews appears below.  It’s followed by a link to a Miami Herald article on the same topic by Alex Harris. A K-12 school in Florida is now offering bullet-resistant shields for students to keep in their backpacks.  The items are available for purchase by the kids’ parents. There are a lot of questions.  One question is whether a conflict of interest exists because the owner of the company making the equipment has two children enrolled at the school (I don’t know whether actual laws or ethics rules address this, so I’m posing the question … Continue reading The World Has Gone Mad. Or is it Just Our Own Backyard?

When Warning Signs Do No Good

This post was revised on November 7, 2017. Links to two New York Times articles appear at the end of this post. Whether your reaction to Sunday’s mass shooting in Texas is sadness, anger or something else, maybe we can all agree on one thing:  Devin Kelley shouldn’t have been running loose — and there was just cause to keep him in some sort of controlled environment before he committed this unspeakable act. We hear about overcrowded prisons.  How many of those inmates pose a real threat?  Devin Kelley’s history confirms that he posed a threat, and on Sunday he was free … Continue reading When Warning Signs Do No Good