Careful With Public Shaming. That Means Don’t.

This morning, I saw a political post on Facebook that I was tempted to share. It was a photograph, allegedly taken in the past few days.  It showed a group of white people partying on a public sidewalk in Manhattan, mask-free and not observing COVID-19 social distancing rules.  The text in the post was credited to a man who identified himself as black, and he was pointing out that a crowd of white people didn’t have the same worries about being confronted by the police that he and his friends would have if they did the same thing. I really … Continue reading Careful With Public Shaming. That Means Don’t.

Social Distancing and Cell Phones

(Disclaimer:  I do not work in or have credentials for any field of healthcare or public health.  The views in this blog post are influenced by personal experience and advice I’ve received through the mainstream media.) During the past couple of months, I’ve made very few trips out of my apartment.  Even before people in San Francisco were told to stay at home, I was reacting to an agoraphobic relapse and concern about COVID-19. I feel fortunate.  Presumably, my recent circumstances gave me protection that some other people didn’t have.  If I was exposed to the virus at some point … Continue reading Social Distancing and Cell Phones

Adulting on TikTok

Last night, I did it.  I downloaded the TikTok app and opened an account. Did I mention that I’m sixty?  That’s kind of old for uploading short videos that play in a loop, but it can be done. It’s unlikely I’ll ever star in my own videos.  My video efforts work better with stuffed animals who have finely cultured personalities.  You know, the stuffies I live with. The app allowed me to upload two existing videos last night, and apparently some people saw them.  A separate app on my phone allowed the stuffies’ lips to move in sync with voices … Continue reading Adulting on TikTok

Behaving Responsibly During the COVID-19 Pandemic

(Disclosure: I am not a health professional.  This post is intended to refer the reader to a site offered by the Centers for Disease Control.) I won’t say too much, but below is a link to a page on the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) website, describing how to make and use cloth masks properly.  Please read the instructions carefully, and consider clicking for other pages on the site. The advice might change slightly in time, so it’s a good idea to go back and look at the site again later. Please make the effort to avoid becoming infected.  Also, … Continue reading Behaving Responsibly During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Did You Overshop? Please Consider Offering to Help Others

The COVID-19 tragedy is testing our ethical values.  We can think of how we can be supportive of each other and use good judgment, or we can hide from our conscience and jump into the next toilet paper fight (Editor’s Note: Other people will see you in the predictable video, so think twice about fighting). Some of us bought too much of one thing or another without being consciously aware of it, and now we can turn that into something positive by being generous with others. The building complex where I live has an online message board for residents, and … Continue reading Did You Overshop? Please Consider Offering to Help Others

Pug Pals: Yay for Vacay! by Flora Ahn (Review)

Pug Pals: Yay for Vacay! By Ahn, Flora Children’s Mystery/Picture Story Book Scholastic Press Hardcover (No Dust Jacket) $9.99 (USD) January 2019 If you’re too shallow to appreciate Pugs, stop reading right now. That said, Flora Ahn has done it again.  Yes, another classic.  Her first Pug-themed children’s book, Pug Pals: Two’s a Crowd (2018), introduced us to Sunny and Rosy, two dogs with human traits who bonded under conditions that didn’t look too promising at first. The second book in the series, Pug Pals: Yay for Vacay! is an equally uplifting continuation of the odd relationship between two dear friends … Continue reading Pug Pals: Yay for Vacay! by Flora Ahn (Review)

Parking the Moose by Dave Hill (Review)

Parking the Moose By Hill, Dave Humorous Essays Hardcover, $29.95 (CAN) $24.00 (USD) Doubleday Canada Published September 2019 Most of us have given some thought to our ancestry, and we think of how differently we’d be living if something hadn’t changed direction before our births.  Personally, I wonder how I would be conducting my life if my maternal grandmother hadn’t left Utah when she was young and stopped practicing the local religion. Actually, I wouldn’t even be here if my maternal grandmother had stayed in Utah.  She married a gentile she met in San Francisco, so with genes being what … Continue reading Parking the Moose by Dave Hill (Review)

Desperation Can Turn You Into a Sad Clown

A few minutes ago I saw a Twitter post which included a short video, allegedly recorded in Australia. The impromptu, candid recording was of a fight between customers in a grocery store.  We can expect that now, with the current health crisis, advice to self-isolate and shortages of merchandise that everyone wants. In this instance, the dispute was over toilet paper.  One customer who loaded her cart with jumbo packages was challenged by another customer who wanted to buy the last package on the shelf. Personally, I was rooting for the woman who wanted only one package (without even being … Continue reading Desperation Can Turn You Into a Sad Clown

Every Human Condition Belongs to Someone

(Disclosure:  This post appears in slightly different form on a private social media page.) Yesterday I visited a grocery store once and a drugstore three times (the drugstore transactions included bottled water, which was too heavy for one trip). In every one of those instances, all hell was breaking loose in the store.  Disruptive “customers,” most or all of whom were stealing, were running amok. I know this is more common in San Francisco now.  Is it getting worse everywhere? While walking home from the grocery store which was about a mile from my apartment, I noticed a copy of … Continue reading Every Human Condition Belongs to Someone